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This newsletter is published by the New Mexico Regional Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (LBPH) and is distributed free to the patrons and other interested parties. The newsletter can be requested in large print or Braille versions, and an audio version can be accessed on NEWSLINE. For information, call LBPH at 1-800-456-5515 or 505-476-9770, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

LBPH Newsletter Summer 2009

CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS WITH DIGITAL TRANSITION

The long anticipated release of digital talking book (DTB) players is expected to begin in late August with a limited supply that will at first be reserved for the use of military veterans. Based upon criteria established by the National Library Service, the New Mexico program is scheduled to receive monthly allotments of 96 players of which 80 will be of “basic” design and 16 will be “advanced”. The primary difference between “basic” and “advanced” will be that the latter will allow the user to “navigate” to various sections and subsections of a recorded book. For most listeners, the basic machine will prove easier to use and sufficient for general listening; however, listeners whose reading preferences lean towards more complex non-fiction books may find the “advanced” machine more useful. Because of their relatively limited supply, “advanced” players are expected to have a waiting list separate from and in addition to the general waiting list for DTB players. 

As the selection of digital talking books will be limited during the transition phase, recipients of DTB players will be encouraged to retain the audiocassette player for as many as three years.

RECENT  RECORDING STUDIO PRODUCTIONS

RNM00154—The Dirty Cowboy written by Amy Timberlake and narrated by John Potter. A freckle-faced New Mexico cowpuncher goes down to the river for his annual meeting with a bar of soap. He tells his trusty old dog to guard his clothes, but after emerging from his bath, he smells so clean that the dog doesn't recognize him anymore and the cowboy has to wrestle the dog for his duds.

RNM00155—The Last Snake Runner by Kimberley Griffiths Little and narrated by John Potter. Fourteen-year-old Kendall, half Anglo and half Acoma Indian, travels through time to sixteenth-century Acoma, Pueblo, where in the midst of the invasion of Spanish conquistadores, he joins his Acoma ancestors to play his destined role as the last member of the Snake Clan.

RNM00156—The Dancing Horses of Acoma written by Helen Rushmore and narrated by Harriet Meryash. A collection of twelve folk stories and legends from Acoma Pueblo, which sits atop a remote mesa in northwestern New Mexico. Compiled by a non-native writer and geared to youthful readers aged ten and older.

RNM00158—Hearts West: True Stories of Mail-Order Brides in the Frontier written by Chris Enss and narrated by Sat Nirmal Khalsa. Includes twelve stories of courageous mail-order brides complete with actual advertisements from both women seeking husbands and men seeking brides. Some were fortunate enough to marry good men and carve out a life on the frontier and live happily ever after; but others found themselves desperate.

RNM00160—Resurrecting Langston Blue written by Robert Greer and narrated by Walter McWalter. Carmen Nguyen never knew her father, an American soldier presumably killed in Vietnam. Charting a course to find him untangles an old mystery involving missing Amerasian war babies, illegal paramilitary operations, and power grabs that lead all the way to the halls of the U.S. Senate. Strong language, violence, and explicit descriptions of sex.

RNM00161—Life! How I Love You! written and narrated by Barbara Murphy. Introduces young readers to the museums of New Mexico where Frida Kahlo--through a painting--inspires young Lily Leroy to use art to "memorise" her dying sister and find a life she loves. Learning these lessons, Lily finds a path through a terrible, blessed time and still finds a life she loves.

RNM00162—Weavers of a Tapestry of Time written by Barbara McDonald and narrated by Kit Blackwood. Presents a history of the New Mexico School for the Visually Handicapped in Alamogordo, New Mexico. Covers one hundred years of school's history from the time of its founding before New Mexico became a state, until 2003 as told by a writer who worked there for more than thirty years.

RNM00164—Cricket in the Web: The 1949 Unsolved Murder That Unraveled Politics in New Mexico written by Paula Moore and narrated by Joyce Townsend. The murder of 18-year-old Ovida "Cricket" Coogler and the discovery of her body seventeen days later in a hastily dug grave near Mesquite, New Mexico, launched a series of trials that would reshape New Mexico politics and expose political corruption. What happened to Cricket on that windy March morning?

RNM00165—The Etruscan written by Linda Lappin and narrated by Joyce Townsend. In 1922 an unsuccessful liaison brings Harriet Sacket to a village in Tuscany to photograph and research Etruscan tombs. Some months later Harriet's friend Sarah meets up with Harriet in Florence. A short time later Sarah is worried about Harriet and sends her housekeeper to look in on her and finds her emaciated to the point of collapse. The only clue to her condition is the discovery of a diary documenting a passionate relationship with a mysterious man.

RNM00166— The Clovis Incident written by Pari Noskin Taichert and narrated by Jeanne Zechmeister. Sasha Solomon just got fired from her job at an HMO in Albuquerque so she heads for Clovis to visit her widowed, and visibly upset friend Mae King. Mae has the body of a Singaporean aviator from Cannon Air Force Base in her stock tank and doesn't know how he got there. Sasha has to clear her friend and find the murderer. But there are forces at work to keep her from the truth.

RNM00167— Artists of the Canyons and Caminos written by Edna Robertson and Sarah Nestor with narration by Patricia Jonietz. Traces the lives and work of painters who settled in Santa Fe in the early years of the twentieth century. Under their influence, Santa Fe grew from a dusty little high-desert town to a thriving community. Reveals little-known facts and profiles of their personalities.