August 25, 2014

"Ten Commandments part of history, N.M. city leaders to say in appeal of court order" – Fox News

The small, northwestern New Mexico city of Bloomfield is choosing orders handed down to Moses over one issued by a judge, but they say it is a matter of history, and not religion.  Leaders in the community of about 8,000, already under fire for refusing to remove a monument in front of City Hall, voted unanimously to appeal a federal court's order.  The 4-0 vote, said city attorney Ryan Lane, stays the judge's order to remove the monument by the Sept. 10 deadline.  Rather than fight the decision from the angle of freedom of speech and religion, Lane is going to present the monument as an historical document just like other monuments in the town depicting the Bill of Rights, Declaration of Independence, and Gettysburg Address.

 

"Ft. Bayard celebrates 148 years" – Las Cruces Sun-News

"It's older than Silver City, older than Hurley, older than Bayard."  That's how Cecelia Bell described Fort Bayard, on the 148th birthday celebration for old United States Army post Saturday morning.  Founded in 1866 during the Apache wars, it played a leading role in the long conflict to defend local miners.  When Geronimo was captured in 1886 and the Apache raids were quelled, the future of the Fort came in doubt.  The fort went back into military service for two years during World War II, housing German prisoners, then reverted to a treatment facility under the New Mexico Department of Health.

 

"Mojave snake sightings rise in southern New Mexico" – Las Cruces Sun-News

Officials in southeastern New Mexico say sightings of one of the most lethal rattlesnakes appear to be on the rise.  The Eddy County Sheriff's Department says more snakes have been spotted in yards this year, including the Mojave rattler.  According to the New Mexico Game and Fish Department, the snake is a type of pit viper that has fangs infused with a neurotoxin that is more potent than some other rattlesnakes. – 8/25/2014