June 30, 2017

 
On Thursday, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released a draft revision to its Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan, which guides plans to remove the wolf from protection under the Endangered Species Act.
 
Under the administration of Gov. Susana Martinez, New Mexico has opposed wolf reintroductions, and in 2011, the Game Commission ended the state’s participation in the program. The commission also voted to stop the federal government from releasing any new captive-raised wolves in the state and sued. A federal judge then blocked any new releases.
 
The Fish and Wildlife Service’s plan is available for public comment until August 29, and there will be four public meetings this summer in New Mexico and Arizona:
 
-July 18, 6-9 p.m. Northern Arizona University, Prochnow Auditorium, South Knowles Drive, Flagstaff, AZ
-July 19, 6-9 p.m.. Hon-Dah Resort, Casino Banquet Hall, 777 AZ–260, Pinetop, AZ
-July 20, 6-9 p.m. Ralph Edwards Auditorium, Civic Center, 400 West Fourth, Truth or Consequences, NM
-July 22, 2-5 p.m. Crowne Plaza Albuquerque, 1901 University Boulevard NE,
Albuquerque, NM
 
 
 
This week the Congressional Budget Office released its report on the Senate bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. It found a number of impacts for older Americans. Those changes could be felt particularly hard in New Mexico.
 
With an aging population, advocates and policy analysts say New Mexico could face significant challenges if the health care bill passes the Senate.
 
"There is a greying of America, but there’s a disproportionate greying of New Mexico," said DeAnza Valencia with the New Mexico chapter of the American Association of Retired People. "That makes us even more at risk for changes that will hurt people over 50 with this bill. We are really bracing for impact should this bill become law." -- 6/28/2017